Skip to main content

GE finally convinces investors that manufacturing is in trouble

This post is for those who appreciate a little irony.

I have written two recent posts about trouble in the manufacturing sector. The first one discussed the Fed's manufacturing report in mid-March and a couple of regional Fed surveys. The second post discussed the Durable Goods report released toward the end of March.

My position at the time was that all these economic reports supplied by the government indicated that industrial stocks were due for a fall.

Based on my outlook, I entered a small position in the ProShares UltraShort Industrials ETF (SIJ). My timing was horrible as the entire market immediately made a strong move up and left pretty much all the ultra short funds reeling. Eventually, SIJ hit a stop and the position was closed with a loss.

Today, General Electric (GE) reports an unexpected shortfall in earnings and industrial stocks and related ETFs plunged while SIJ jumped up 7.88%.

Irony #1: GE's reason for the decline in earnings: primarily problems in the financial sector.

Irony #2: The infrastructure portion of the business turned in double-digit gains. In other words, one of GE's biggest manufacturing operations performed better than any other business segment. Yet industrial companies, in general, took a hit.

By way of providing further detail, NBC/Universal was singled out by analysts as showing weak growth. Still that was better than the negative growth in the healthcare segment (off 17%), Commercial Finance (down 20%) and GE Money (down 19%). In the overall industrial segment, profit growth was down 16% despite the success of the infrastructure operation.

During the conference call, however, the company did admit that conditions in the U.S. are slowing and that, generally speaking, it is a "tough environment". Appliances and NBC/Universal were identified as segments that would be "an early warning" to problems in the economy.

GE says it is "not counting on the business getting any better, vis-à-vis...the U.S. consumer" for the rest of the year. Accordingly, it lowered its projections for 2008 by 5% to 8%.

Irony #3: The government generates all these reports which may move the markets for a day or two but no analysts actually change their views on the bellwether companies that might be affected. Finally, GE confirms the bad news in the reports and the market finally buys into the idea that maybe manufacturing is hitting a rough spot. A market sell-off ensues.

Apparently, I am not the only one who was expecting problems with industrial/manufacturing stocks. In a Wall Street Journal MarketBeat interview with Phil Orlando of Federated Investors, he had the following comment regarding GE: "They missed the quarter badly and as you dig through the data you find they had three problems: one is financial services, one is domestic appliances, which is a quasi-housing play and the third area was, surprisingly, health care. Two of the three misses on GE’s earnings were altogether predictable." Predictable how? The same reports I referred to above were probably among the sources. And the well-known slowdown in all industries related to housing easily translates into declines in a number of manufacturing sectors.

At any rate, SIJ closed today at $63.23 and GE closed at $32.05. What price they will be trading at in a few months?

Sources:
Silicon Alley Insider - Pathetic GE: Blame Bear Stearns for Our Mess

MarketWatch - General Electric's quarterly net off 6%; outlook cut

MarketBeat - Q & A: Phil Orlando, Federated Investors

Disclosure: author has no position in GE nor SIJ

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Unlock Stock Market Profits - Key #1

This is the first in an ongoing series of articles where I discuss what I feel are keys to successful investing. It is based on a post that provides a summary of the ten keys that individual investors should use to identify profitable stock trades. ( Click here to read the original post ) There are two basic steps to investing. First, you need to find stocks that seem to have some potential. Then you have to determine whether these stocks are actually good investments. There are many stocks that at first glance look interesting, but further research reveals that there are too many negatives to warrant taking a position. This first post in the series starts at the beginning: getting good investment ideas. Key #1: If something special is happening to a stock, it will be reflected in some kind of unusual activity in the markets. As individual investors, we will never be the first to know; however, unusual activity can be an early sign that allows us to follow the Wall Street profess

Unlock Stock Market Profits - Key #4

This is the fourth article in a series of posts describing 10 tools to help you identify and evaluate good investing ideas. It is based on a post that provides a summary of the ten keys that individual investors should use to identify profitable stock trades. ( Click here to read the original post ) With this fourth post, we will continue another step along the path of finding stocks that seem to have some potential. The first post in the series discussed how to use unusual activity to identify investing ideas. The second post described how to use stock screeners. The third post described how to use lists of new highs and new lows. This post will focus on identifying social or business trends in order to find investing ideas. Information on new trends might turn up anywhere. In conversation with friends or business associates, in newspapers or magazines, on TV or though your work. The key is to be aware of trends and how they start, stop or change. We'll start by describing wh

Interactive Ads - Google one-ups Yahoo again

Google's ( GOOG ) press release describing the expansion of a beta program for what are being called Gadget Ads has again shown that Google is unparalleled at melding technology and advertising to benefit its bottom line. Gadget Ads are mini-web pages or "widgets" that can be embedded within publisher pages. I have written in the past on Yahoo's ( YHOO ) Smart Ads and how, by more precisely targeting site users and adjusting ad content accordingly, they provide a much desired evolution of the banner or display ad format. Though Smart Ads and Gadget Ads are not really the same, I think it is fair to say that Google has seen the challenge of Smart Ads and has chosen to leapfrog Yahoo by rolling out its own update to the display ad format. The evolution of the Gadget Ad -- One of the trends on the Internet over the last year or so involves software developers creating "widgets" which can be hosted within web pages and blogs. Widgets can be pretty much any